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Fri, Feb 09

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Virtual Online Seminar

02.09 Research Forum: Impact of Primitive Reflexes and Craniosacral Blocks

Join Dr. Elizabeth Forgione in discussing the prevalence of active primary reflexes and craniosacral blocks, how this impacts healthy children, and the relationship with neurodevelopment. The session begins with a presentation of the recent research study and concludes with an open discussion.

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02.09 Research Forum: Impact of Primitive Reflexes and Craniosacral Blocks
02.09 Research Forum: Impact of Primitive Reflexes and Craniosacral Blocks

Time & Location

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Feb 09, 2024, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Virtual Online Seminar

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About the Event

Join Dr. Elizabeth Forgione in discussing the prevalence of active primary reflexes and craniosacral blocks, how this impacts apparently healthy children, and the relationship with neurodevelopment. The session begins with a presentation of the recent research study and concludes with an open discussion among participants regarding how this may impact your current work and the Masgutova Method. 

Abstract: Background: In healthy children, the frequency of the anomalous persistence of primitive

reflexes (PRs) and craniosacral blocks (CBs) is unknown, as well as their impact on neurodevelopment,

behavior disorders and related consequences. We aim to know the prevalence of anomalous PRs

and CBs in apparently healthy children and their relationships with behavior and neurodevelopment

anomalies. Methods: Participants (n = 120) were evaluated via a physical examination to detect

PRs and CBs and an ad hoc parent survey to collect perinatal events, and children’s behavioral

assessments were conducted by teachers using the Battelle score. Results: PRs were present in

89.5%. Moro (70.8%), cervical asymmetric (78.3%) and cervical symmetric PRs (67.5%) were the most

frequently observed PRs. CBs were found in 83.2%, and the most frequent CBs were dura mater

(77.5%) and sphenoid bone (70%) blocks. Moro, cervical asymmetric and cervical symmetric active

primitive reflexes were significantly associated with cranial blocks of dura mater, parietal zones and

sphenoid bone sway. Gestational disorders or perinatal complications were associated with a higher

frequency of PRs and CBs. The presence of PRs and CBs was associated with abnormal Battelle

scores and neurobehavioral problems. Conclusion: The presence of PRs and CBs in children without

diagnosed diseases is frequent and related to disturbances in childhood neurodevelopment.

Tickets

  • Individual Session

    $25.00
    +$0.63 service fee
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  • Forum Annual Subscription

    $200.00
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Total

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